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©IMAGE ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD/ALAMY

©IMAGE ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD/ALAMY

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LAST ISSUE WE INVITED PUZZLER players to identify these verses:


’Tis with our judgments as our watches, none
Go just alike, yet each believes his own.
In poets as true genius is but rare,
True taste as seldom is the critics share.

These astute heroic couplets are from Essay on Criticism (1711) by the great 18th-century poet Alexander Pope. Among Pope’s well-known aphorisms is the observation that “A little knowledge is a dangerous thing.” It is also Pope who noted that “To err is human, to forgive divine.”

AND NOW PUZZLE THIS: A king landed in my tiny harbor. Over the years, much fish has landed there as well—and still does. Today, I’m something of an artists’ colony, and enjoy some of the most plentiful sunshine in Britain. Where am I?

Yes, do be a Puzzler player. Email your answer to
[email protected]
All entries are acknowledged.

Out of the Post

WE ENJOYED your article on Kenilworth (September 2013). It brought back fond memories of our 2010 visit to that castle, where John’s ancestor Thomas Underhill was a steward during Leicester’s time.
John and Clem Underhill
El Cerrito, Calif
.

I WANTED TO TELL you how much I appreciated your memorial essay for Margaret Thatcher. To paraphrase what was said of Pres. Grover Cleveland, “We love her for the enemies she has made.” We made our first visit to the UK in 1984, while the miners’ strike was on. In the evening, sitting in the B&B TV lounges, we got an earful of local opinion of the coal miners’ union president. One news program pointed out that UK-produced coal cost nearly twice as much per ton as coal imported from the U.S. Keep up the good work.
Mel Starr
Schoolcraft, Mich
.

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DANA HUNTLEY

DANA HUNTLEY

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Sites for the Savvy

Keeping in Touch

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WE ARE ALWAYS DELIGHTED to hear from British Heritage readers—and to occasionally pass along the enthusiasms and travel tips you share. We would always love to hear if you’ve used British Heritage in planning your own adventures in Britain.
Our posting address is 19300 Promenade Drive, Leesburg, VA 20176. Most folk these days, however, conveniently email us at [email protected]

Events Worth a Detour!


The Great British Cheese Festival The fabulously cheesy Great British Cheese Festival is coming up at Cardiff Castle on September 25 and 26. Get a headful of Lincolnshire Poacher or Stinking Bishop. Fantastic foods from pies to pastries by artisan producers at the Best of British Market, and local Welsh produce at the True Taste of Wales.

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©PAUL THOMPSON IMAGES/ALAMY

©PAUL THOMPSON IMAGES/ALAMY

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Blackpool Illuminations Every autumn Blackpool is set ablaze by the annual illuminations. This spectacular light show started in 1879 and has since grown into a luminous extravaganza using more than a million lamps and more than 500 floodlights and spotlights from September 3–November 7. Seven miles of seafront form a mesmerizing display of shimmering lights, miles of neon, lasers, glittering tableaux and more.

Dylan Thomas Festival Wales’ most famous poet, Dylan Thomas, is celebrated each year in the ugly, lovely town of his birth, Swansea, South Wales. From October 27 to November 9, Thomas’ life, work and legacy will be explored and commemorated with numerous events. Many festival events take place at the Dylan Thomas Centre.

York’s Christmas Market If you need an extra reason to visit York, come during its Christmas markets. The St. Nicholas Fayre on November 25 is York’s biggest and most popular. The city comes alive with Victorian costumed traders, carol singers, roasted chestnuts and hot chocolate laced with brandy. There’s a colorful international Christmas Market every day from December 1 to 19 on Parliament Street.

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©CATERS NEWS AGENCY

©CATERS NEWS AGENCY

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AMONG THE MOST ICONIC IMAGES of rural England is the view of cobbled Gold’s Hill in Shaftesbury, Dorset. The picture, looking south down the hill, was made famous by a television advertisement for Hovis bread that first aired 40 years ago, and the hill is colloquially recognized today as “Hovis Hill.” This stunning image of Gold’s Hill was taken by photographer Andrew Whyte, who planned the shot for months. Thanks to Dorset’s “no street light” policy, Whyte managed to clearly capture the Milky Way galaxy spread out above the hill. He had a one-week window in which to capture the sky, and drove 70 miles from his home in Portsmouth to take the picture at 1 a.m. The brightest light visible in the photo is a 40-watt bulb.

Coming Up in British Heritage:

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DANA HUNTLEY

DANA HUNTLEY

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  • Safari to the Desert Of Dungeness

  • That Great British Seafood

  • Snowdonia’s Mediterranean Resort

  • Cotswold Lions and Wool Worth

  • World of the Iron Masters

  • Behind Closed Doors at the British Museum